Herald History

Wed
08
Jan

Former Herald Owner Dies

by DAVE SIMPKINS 

STAFF WRITER 

Wed
08
Jan

Joseph Simonton

 

On Wednesday, the newspaper you have in your hands turns a hardy 140 years old.

The first issue of the Sauk Centre Herald was put out by Joseph Simonton, his young printer's devil and a volunteer named N. H. Miner June 6, 1867.

Simonton set each piece of type by hand and printed two pages at a time on an old 1800 pound Washington hand press that found its way from the Minnesota Pioneer, the state's first newspaper.

The Herald was the first continuous newspaper west of the Mississippi River and east of the Rocky Mountains. It would become the official newspaper for Todd, Douglas, Otter Tail, Pope, Grant and Morrison County.

If you were holding a copy of that first newspaper you would see four broadsheet pages with two pages of boilerplate national and international news and features and two pages of local news.

Wed
08
Jan

Frank Eddy

 

Frank Eddy would have to be the Sauk Centre Herald's most colorful and famous publisher. While he only owned the Herald from 1903 to 1907, he worked as a printer's devil in the early years of the publication. He also submitted columns all his life.

He was the first native-born Minnesotan to be elected to Congress, representing the Sixth District as a Republican from 1894 to 1902. He held several state and national Republican party positions, worked for the Department of Commerce promoting immigration.

Eddy came to Sauk Centre as an eleven-year-old boy in a wagon train in the fall of 1867. It took his family 21 days to get here from Owatonna with 10 of those days on the rough and wild Timber Road from St. Cloud.

Eddy wrote a guest column for the Herald in 1928, recounting the journey on the singletrack trail through a thick forest with herds of deer, an occasional bear and howling wolves at night.

Wed
08
Jan

Charles Hendryx

 

Charles Hendryx

 

I'm continuing my celebration of the Herald's 140th year with a series of profiles of the pioneer publishers. These old publishers give us a good look at life long ago and what they felt was important to the past and to the future.

Charles F. Hendryx was the Herald's second editor and publisher. He said when he came to town in July 1879, the frontier town was like a child in swaddling clothes and when he left in 1903, it was like a young child running around in knickers.

The city of 750 people was still a wild-west town with trappers bringing furs in from the north, settlers riding in ox carts coming from the east while Indians still camped along Fairy Lake.

The city had two flour mills and one grain elevator, a mile and a half of wooden sidewalks and one rail line with two trains a day. A steamboat hauled passengers and produce down Sauk Lake.

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